Tag Archives: public art

Public Art City of Sydney 2

Reviewing City of Sydney’s public art commissions

1406603825907.jpg-300x0I had previously posted about the City of Sydney’s announcements for three new works for Sydney’s public spaces. click here.

I have just read online the views of the Crikey urbanist, Alan Davies. There’s a lot more to say about this guy’s reviews and some of his strange views on urban issues . He has some serious problems! More on some of his comments later – watch this space. Continue reading Public Art City of Sydney 2

Womens Centennial

Review: Public Art

Centenary of Women’s Suffrage

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This is an unfortunate case of how things can get out of hand and go wrong in a huge way.

Sometimes the planets line up and all sorts of magic can happen. At other times, no matter what positive steps are taken, some things are just destined to go off the rails. It also does not help to have bureaucratic spin doctors, media loving a beat up, writers being over zealous in their responses and creative people being precious.

In this case the losers were the people of Australia, particularly women,  who deserved to have in 2003 a significant memorial public art piece to celebrate the centenary of women’s suffrage.

Continue reading Womens Centennial

Public Art

Review: Public Art

Sculpture of Ben Chifley and John Curtin, Canberra

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I have driven passed this sculptural piece, by Peter Corlett, many many times. The pair of sculptures look very natural on the corner to the extent that I dare say the casual observer and busy drivers may pass by and miss that they are bronze figures. There’s no plinth. They have been attached directly onto the footpath.

Continue reading Public Art

Hossein and Angela Valamanesh

Review: Public Art

The Australian Monument to the Great Irish Famine,
artists, Hossein and Angela Valamanesh, 1999

I came across this wonderful piece recently when walking by the old Barracks site on the way to something else.

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I have to admit to a full Irish background. As far as I know the many branches of what became my family were Irish who variously arrived in Australia mid to later in the 19th Century.

Continue reading Hossein and Angela Valamanesh

Sculpture at Lambrigg

Review: Visual Arts

Saturday 19 October 2013

The National Gallery of Australia (NGA) has a wonderful sculpture garden that very few people wander about in. Because of the architect’s design, in that the garden is not naturally connected to the spaces inside, it means that unless they know about the sculpture garden, most visitors to exhibitions do not even see the gardens, let alone the sculptures. A very similarly designed sculpture garden, with many of the same features, including gum trees, in Pasadena is very much part of the museum visit as it allows people to wander in and out of the garden from various galleries.

The ANU has a campus that has a fantastic collection of sculpture throughout the whole campus. Very few people take the time to enjoy the huge range of artworks. The campus is a great place to take long walks, to take in the artworks as well as to enjoy the very pleasant ambience of the well looked after campus gardens and landscaped works.

Today hundreds of people drove out of Canberra to a property near Tharwa to take in a temporary exhibition of Sculpture in the Park. So yes, people are interested in wandering amongst sculpture in a park. And these were local artists/sculptors, so there was that very added attraction. It was a beautiful spring day – being about 25C.

Continue reading Sculpture at Lambrigg

Public Art Altered

Art in Public Places

Comment on altering a piece of public art

ANU Public Art: Dadang Christanto.  Witness, 2004

The ANU has wonderful array of public art throughout their very nice campus.

One of my favourite pieces has been surrounded by fence.

I visited the site today and walked around and pondered:

Why the fence? Its presence just did not make sense.

Here’s a link to more on this topic, and more photos

Let me know if you can throw any light on this mystery.

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Paul Costigan, October 2013